Four Questions with Carver-Atlanta coach Darren Myles

Football, FourGHSF Daily asked Georgia head coaches to answer these four questions. We’ll report from a different head coach each day.

Darren Myles, Carver-Atlanta

1. What is the most memorable game you’ve been a part of as a player or coach? “My most memorable game as a player was my senior year at Purdue in 1988 when we upset Ohio State in their home stadium. As a coach, I’ve had several from watching Jamal Lewis rush for 300 yards in the first half as running backs/offensive coordinator at Douglass to an upset of McNair in 2006, after they had upset Stephenson in my second year as the coach at Carver. But my most memorable game is when we played White County in the first round of the state playoffs in 2007. It was a home game at Grady Stadium, and the temperature was about 15 degrees. We were without our leading rusher, Demond Dennis, with a sprained ankle. White County took a 13-0 lead, and the temperature wasn’t getting any warmer. We gave a very inspirational halftime speech and made some key adjustments. We came out of the locker room a different team, and the elements became a non-factor. My nephew Mark Williams Jr. scored the tying touchdown, my other nephew Kevin Myles Jr. blocked the game-winning field goal, and my son Darren Myles Jr. caught it and ran 30 yards before being tackled. This forced overtime. We had the first possession and scored on fourth down. White County then got possession and on fourth down their pass attempt was broken up by my son and we won 20-13.”

2. Which high school coach would you want your son to play for, and why? “I was blessed to coach my son and due to Hurricane Katrina my two nephews as well. But if I had to choose a coach it would be two, Joseph Polk III, who died in May of 2009. We played together in high school, coached together at Douglass, Southside and Carver, where he was my defensive coordinator. He was one of my best friends that I considered a brother. And Michael Sims, who was an assistant on my high school team in New Orleans. I learned a lot of football from both of them but more importantly learned how to be a servant to the players. They both believe in developing well-rounded student-athletes and did an excellent job of holding them accountable. They also did a great job of promoting athletes to college recruiters.”

3. What is your pet peeve as a coach or favorite saying/motto? “My favorite saying is ‘Coach Them All!’ I believe that every player needs to be coached and developed as if they were your own son, nephew or grandson. Oftentimes people just want to coach talent, but there is no challenge of your teaching and coaching in that. We coach them all because we do not want to be held hostage by a talented player who will not conform to the team or school rules. My favorite quote is: ‘The man who thinks he can and the man who thinks he can’t are both right. Which one are you?’ – Henry Ford. My motto is ‘All we don’t have we don’t need.’ This simply means we have to do the best we can with what we have. We may not have the size, depth, facilities, etc., but we still have to coach, teach and develop with what we have. Pet peeve: ‘Attendance and Punctuality’ to practice and school as well ‘Intensity and Tempo’ during practice. I believe that football is a direct correlation to life. If you don’t go to work, you do not get paid.”

4. Which GHSA policy or high school football rule would you most like to see changed? “Like some of the other coaches have answered, I would like to see us get control of the transferring and recruiting of players. I spoke about development of players earlier. Coaches put a lot of time and give a lot effort in developing players for two-three years, and the reward is them leaving to help make another program better. I know that the GHSA is aware and will put something in place to get this under control.”

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